5G Race Could Leave Personal Privacy in the Dust -- Journal Report

5G种族可能将个人隐私留在尘埃中--华尔街日报报道

2019/11/12 11:00  道琼斯

DJ 5G Race Could Leave Personal Privacy in the Dust -- Journal Report


By Drew FitzGerald

Wireless companies racing to build new 5G networks are expected to bring billions of cameras, sensors and other "smart" devices along for the ride, a trend that could spell trouble for personal privacy.

Telecom companies have spent the past year blanketing parts of China, South Korea and the U.S. with fifth-generation cellular service, a technology that supercharges downloads to smartphones, laptops and tablets. But engineers say 5G's true potential comes from the ability to cheaply link thousands of smaller devices -- like security cameras, traffic sensors and other surveillance gadgets -- to a single cell tower at a time, up from a few hundred today.

At the same time, other new standards are making cellular devices cheaper, more plentiful and easier to maintain, allowing sensors to be put in places where previously it was too costly to do so. These machines also are getting better at sipping power so that a connected device can now spend years in the field without a battery replacement.

"5G is going to allow sensors all over the place," AT&T Chief Executive Randall Stephenson said at September event hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D.C. "4G networks in a square mile can connect thousands of devices. 5G, millions of devices."

All of these devices will be harvesting reams of data from the world around them, executives such as Mr. Stephenson say. Already, cities around the globe have started to use sensors to collect data on traffic, pedestrians, garbage and buildings. These so-called "smart city" testbeds offer a window into just how much information cutting-edge wireless networks might be able to gather.

Police in China, for example, have piloted camera-equipped glasses that use 5G's extremely quick response times to power facial-recognition software, allowing authorities to spot targets before they leave an area. Companies based in North America and Europe, meanwhile, are highlighting the opportunities 5G technology offers merchants and marketers, such as the ability to pinpoint how long a customer lingers in front of a certain store shelf or display.

Privacy rules

The flood of data that technology companies expect to collect underscores the need for federal privacy legislation, AT&T's Mr. Stephenson says. Although lawmakers in Congress have proposed some federal privacy rules, they have failed to enact them, opening the way for state and local governments to fill the void.

AT&T has criticized this hodgepodge approach, arguing that companies need more predictable nationwide policies that aren't as strict as California's, which will enable consumers to prohibit the sale of their personal data and ban discounts and other special treatment for users who opt in to sharing their information.

Without a set of standard privacy rules in the U.S., Chinese companies rolling out 5G networks and services could gain an edge, he suggests.

"The Chinese are spending a lot of cycles and a lot of time permitting cell sites," Mr. Stephenson said. "They're not spending a lot of cycles and time on privacy policies."

Of course, cameras and sensors predate the first 5G specifications. AT&T, Verizon Communications Inc. and T-Mobile USA Inc., for example, use 4G signals to track truck fleets and rental cars.

Cellphone carriers and app makers already collect troves of information about their users, including detailed data on where they live, work and shop. Advertising exchanges make the universe of companies with access to personal location data even bigger.

New 5G networks, however, will be able to track smartphone users with more precision, pinpointing a device within centimeters rather than meters.

"People know that they're being tracked online," says Pankaj Srivastava, chief operating officer for FigLeaf App Inc., a software maker that offers tools to safeguard personal information. "People don't realize that they can be in the same situation in the physical world."

Fine line

Still, some telecom industry experts warn that aggressive privacy protections could undercut the economic benefits 5G technology promises. Tech companies counting on troves of data from devices like cameras and street sensors to train their software often attack Europe's General Data Protection Regulation, a set of strict digital privacy rules that went into effect in 2018, for depriving them of raw data to analyze, a building block for more advanced artificial intelligence.

"Europeans shot themselves in the foot with the GDPR," says John Strand, a Denmark-based telecom consultant. "Read literally, it prohibits AI and machine learning."

At the same time, lax 5G oversight also could threaten security, says David Simpson, a Virginia Tech professor who previously ran the Federal Communications Commission's public safety and homeland security bureau.

Mr. Simpson cited two examples that affect public safety. On one hand, cheaper smart sensors could collect real-time information about the structural integrity of buildings, roads and bridges, arming civil engineers with data to avoid accidents. If abused, similar sensors and cameras could also gather location data from pedestrians passing through the area without their consent, either on purpose or incidentally.

"While I very much want to not have a crane tumble on my head, I also want to not have my movement throughout a city trackable by Big Brother, " Mr. Simpson says. "There are agreed-upon privacy norms that we should be pursuing. You shouldn't collect more information on me than you need."

Mr. FitzGerald is a reporter for The Wall Street Journal in Washington, D.C. Email him at andrew.fitzgerald@wsj.com.



(END) Dow Jones Newswires

November 11, 2019 22:00 ET (03:00 GMT)

DJ 5G Race Could Leave Personal Privacy in the Dust -- Journal Report


By Drew FitzGerald

Wireless companies racing to build new 5G networks are expected to bring billions of cameras, sensors and other "smart" devices along for the ride, a trend that could spell trouble for personal privacy.

Telecom companies have spent the past year blanketing parts of China, South Korea and the U.S. with fifth-generation cellular service, a technology that supercharges downloads to smartphones, laptops and tablets. But engineers say 5G's true potential comes from the ability to cheaply link thousands of smaller devices -- like security cameras, traffic sensors and other surveillance gadgets -- to a single cell tower at a time, up from a few hundred today.

At the same time, other new standards are making cellular devices cheaper, more plentiful and easier to maintain, allowing sensors to be put in places where previously it was too costly to do so. These machines also are getting better at sipping power so that a connected device can now spend years in the field without a battery replacement.

"5G is going to allow sensors all over the place," AT&T Chief Executive Randall Stephenson said at September event hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D.C. "4G networks in a square mile can connect thousands of devices. 5G, millions of devices."

All of these devices will be harvesting reams of data from the world around them, executives such as Mr. Stephenson say. Already, cities around the globe have started to use sensors to collect data on traffic, pedestrians, garbage and buildings. These so-called "smart city" testbeds offer a window into just how much information cutting-edge wireless networks might be able to gather.

Police in China, for example, have piloted camera-equipped glasses that use 5G's extremely quick response times to power facial-recognition software, allowing authorities to spot targets before they leave an area. Companies based in North America and Europe, meanwhile, are highlighting the opportunities 5G technology offers merchants and marketers, such as the ability to pinpoint how long a customer lingers in front of a certain store shelf or display.

Privacy rules

The flood of data that technology companies expect to collect underscores the need for federal privacy legislation, AT&T's Mr. Stephenson says. Although lawmakers in Congress have proposed some federal privacy rules, they have failed to enact them, opening the way for state and local governments to fill the void.

AT&T has criticized this hodgepodge approach, arguing that companies need more predictable nationwide policies that aren't as strict as California's, which will enable consumers to prohibit the sale of their personal data and ban discounts and other special treatment for users who opt in to sharing their information.

Without a set of standard privacy rules in the U.S., Chinese companies rolling out 5G networks and services could gain an edge, he suggests.

"The Chinese are spending a lot of cycles and a lot of time permitting cell sites," Mr. Stephenson said. "They're not spending a lot of cycles and time on privacy policies."

Of course, cameras and sensors predate the first 5G specifications. AT&T, Verizon Communications Inc. and T-Mobile USA Inc., for example, use 4G signals to track truck fleets and rental cars.

Cellphone carriers and app makers already collect troves of information about their users, including detailed data on where they live, work and shop. Advertising exchanges make the universe of companies with access to personal location data even bigger.

New 5G networks, however, will be able to track smartphone users with more precision, pinpointing a device within centimeters rather than meters.

"People know that they're being tracked online," says Pankaj Srivastava, chief operating officer for FigLeaf App Inc., a software maker that offers tools to safeguard personal information. "People don't realize that they can be in the same situation in the physical world."

Fine line

Still, some telecom industry experts warn that aggressive privacy protections could undercut the economic benefits 5G technology promises. Tech companies counting on troves of data from devices like cameras and street sensors to train their software often attack Europe's General Data Protection Regulation, a set of strict digital privacy rules that went into effect in 2018, for depriving them of raw data to analyze, a building block for more advanced artificial intelligence.

"Europeans shot themselves in the foot with the GDPR," says John Strand, a Denmark-based telecom consultant. "Read literally, it prohibits AI and machine learning."

At the same time, lax 5G oversight also could threaten security, says David Simpson, a Virginia Tech professor who previously ran the Federal Communications Commission's public safety and homeland security bureau.

Mr. Simpson cited two examples that affect public safety. On one hand, cheaper smart sensors could collect real-time information about the structural integrity of buildings, roads and bridges, arming civil engineers with data to avoid accidents. If abused, similar sensors and cameras could also gather location data from pedestrians passing through the area without their consent, either on purpose or incidentally.

"While I very much want to not have a crane tumble on my head, I also want to not have my movement throughout a city trackable by Big Brother, " Mr. Simpson says. "There are agreed-upon privacy norms that we should be pursuing. You shouldn't collect more information on me than you need."

Mr. FitzGerald is a reporter for The Wall Street Journal in Washington, D.C. Email him at andrew.fitzgerald@wsj.com.



(END) Dow Jones Newswires

November 11, 2019 22:00 ET (03:00 GMT)

Copyright (c) 2019 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

DJ 5G比赛可能会把个人隐私留在尘埃中--华尔街日报报道


德鲁·菲茨杰拉德(Drew Fitzgerald)著

竞相建设新的5G网络的无线公司预计将带来数十亿摄像头、传感器和其他“智能”设备,这一趋势可能会给个人隐私带来麻烦。

过去一年里,电信公司用第五代蜂窝服务覆盖了中国、韩国和美国的部分地区,这项技术可以为智能手机、笔记本电脑和平板电脑提供超级下载。但工程师们表示,5G的真正潜力来自于将数千个较小的设备--如安全摄像头、交通传感器和其他监控设备--一次廉价连接到一个手机塔的能力,而现在只有几百个。

与此同时,其他新标准正在使蜂窝设备更便宜,数量更多,更容易维护,允许将传感器放置在以前成本太高的地方。这些机器在吸电方面也变得越来越好,因此一个连接的设备现在可以在没有电池更换的情况下在现场花费数年时间。

“5G将允许传感器遍布各地,”AT&T首席执行官兰德尔·斯蒂芬森(Randall Stephenson)在华盛顿特区外交关系委员会(Council On Foreign Relations)9月份举办的活动上说。“一平方英里的4G网络可以连接数千台设备。5G,数百万台设备。”

斯蒂芬森等高管说,所有这些设备都将从周围世界收集大量数据。世界各地的城市已经开始使用传感器来收集交通、行人、垃圾和建筑物的数据。这些所谓的“智能城市”试验床为尖端无线网络可能收集的信息量提供了一个窗口。

例如,中国警方已经试行了配备摄像头的眼镜,这种眼镜使用5G极快的响应时间来驱动面部识别软件,使当局能够在目标离开某个区域之前发现目标。与此同时,总部位于北美和欧洲的公司正在强调5G技术为商家和营销人员提供的机会,例如能够精确定位客户在某个商店货架或陈列品前逗留多长时间。

隐私规则

AT&T的斯蒂芬森说,科技公司期望收集的大量数据突显出联邦隐私立法的必要性。尽管国会议员提出了一些联邦隐私规则,但他们未能颁布,为州政府和地方政府填补这一空白开辟了道路。

AT&T批评了这种大杂烩的做法,认为公司需要更可预测的全国性政策,而不像加州的政策那样严格,这将使消费者能够禁止出售他们的个人数据,并禁止对选择分享信息的用户提供折扣和其他特殊待遇。

他表示,如果美国没有一套标准的隐私规则,中国公司推出5G网络和服务可能会获得优势。

“中国人花了很多周期和时间来允许手机网站,”斯蒂芬森先生说。“他们没有在隐私政策上花费很多周期和时间。”

当然,摄像头和传感器早于第一批5G规格。AT&T,Verizon Communications Inc.例如,T-Mobile USA Inc.使用4G信号跟踪卡车车队和租赁汽车。

手机运营商和应用程序制造商已经收集了大量关于用户的信息,包括他们居住、工作和购物地点的详细数据。广告交换使得能够访问个人位置数据的公司的世界变得更大。

然而,新的5G网络将能够更精确地跟踪智能手机用户,精确定位一个厘米内的设备,而不是几米。

“人们知道他们正在被在线跟踪,”软件制造商figleaf App Inc.的首席运营官潘卡杰·斯里瓦斯塔瓦(Pankaj Srivasava)说。该公司提供保护个人信息的工具。“人们没有意识到,在现实世界中,他们可以处于同样的境地。”

细线

不过,一些电信业专家警告称,激进的隐私保护可能会削弱5G技术承诺的经济效益。依靠相机和街道传感器等设备的大量数据来培训软件的科技公司经常攻击欧洲的“通用数据保护条例”(General Data Protection Regulations),这是一套严格的数字隐私规则,于2018年生效,因为它剥夺了它们要分析的原始数据,而原始数据是更先进的人工智能的基石。

“欧洲人用GDPR打了自己的脚,”丹麦电信顾问约翰·斯特兰德(John Strand)说。“从字面上看,它禁止人工智能和机器学习。”

同时,宽松的5G监管也可能威胁安全,弗吉尼亚理工大学教授大卫·辛普森(David Simpson)说,他曾担任联邦通信委员会(Federal Communications Commission)公共安全和国土安全部的负责人。

辛普森先生列举了两个影响公共安全的例子。一方面,便宜的智能传感器可以收集有关建筑物、道路和桥梁结构完整性的实时信息,为土木工程师提供数据以避免事故。如果被滥用,类似的传感器和摄像机也可以在未经行人同意的情况下,有意或无意地从路过该区域的行人那里收集位置数据。

辛普森先生说:“虽然我非常不希望起重机跌倒在我的头上,但我也不想让我的运动在一个被老大哥追踪的城市里进行。”“我们应该遵循一致的隐私规范。你不应该收集比你需要的更多的关于我的信息。”

菲茨杰拉德先生是华盛顿特区“华尔街日报”的记者,请给他发电子邮件:andrew.fitzgerald@wsj.com。



(完)道琼斯通讯社

2019年11月11日东部时间22:00(格林威治时间03:00)

DJ 5G比赛可能会把个人隐私留在尘埃中--华尔街日报报道


德鲁·菲茨杰拉德(Drew Fitzgerald)著

竞相建设新的5G网络的无线公司预计将带来数十亿摄像头、传感器和其他“智能”设备,这一趋势可能会给个人隐私带来麻烦。

过去一年里,电信公司用第五代蜂窝服务覆盖了中国、韩国和美国的部分地区,这项技术可以为智能手机、笔记本电脑和平板电脑提供超级下载。但工程师们表示,5G的真正潜力来自于将数千个较小的设备--如安全摄像头、交通传感器和其他监控设备--一次廉价连接到一个手机塔的能力,而现在只有几百个。

与此同时,其他新标准正在使蜂窝设备更便宜,数量更多,更容易维护,允许将传感器放置在以前成本太高的地方。这些机器在吸电方面也变得越来越好,因此一个连接的设备现在可以在没有电池更换的情况下在现场花费数年时间。

“5G将允许传感器遍布各地,”AT&T首席执行官兰德尔·斯蒂芬森(Randall Stephenson)在华盛顿特区外交关系委员会(Council On Foreign Relations)9月份举办的活动上说。“一平方英里的4G网络可以连接数千台设备。5G,数百万台设备。”

斯蒂芬森等高管说,所有这些设备都将从周围世界收集大量数据。世界各地的城市已经开始使用传感器来收集交通、行人、垃圾和建筑物的数据。这些所谓的“智能城市”试验床为尖端无线网络可能收集的信息量提供了一个窗口。

例如,中国警方已经试行了配备摄像头的眼镜,这种眼镜使用5G极快的响应时间来驱动面部识别软件,使当局能够在目标离开某个区域之前发现目标。与此同时,总部位于北美和欧洲的公司正在强调5G技术为商家和营销人员提供的机会,例如能够精确定位客户在某个商店货架或陈列品前逗留多长时间。

隐私规则

AT&T的斯蒂芬森说,科技公司期望收集的大量数据突显出联邦隐私立法的必要性。尽管国会议员提出了一些联邦隐私规则,但他们未能颁布,为州政府和地方政府填补这一空白开辟了道路。

AT&T批评了这种大杂烩的做法,认为公司需要更可预测的全国性政策,而不像加州的政策那样严格,这将使消费者能够禁止出售他们的个人数据,并禁止对选择分享信息的用户提供折扣和其他特殊待遇。

他表示,如果美国没有一套标准的隐私规则,中国公司推出5G网络和服务可能会获得优势。

“中国人花了很多周期和时间来允许手机网站,”斯蒂芬森先生说。“他们没有在隐私政策上花费很多周期和时间。”

当然,摄像头和传感器早于第一批5G规格。AT&T,Verizon Communications Inc.例如,T-Mobile USA Inc.使用4G信号跟踪卡车车队和租赁汽车。

手机运营商和应用程序制造商已经收集了大量关于用户的信息,包括他们居住、工作和购物地点的详细数据。广告交换使得能够访问个人位置数据的公司的世界变得更大。

然而,新的5G网络将能够更精确地跟踪智能手机用户,精确定位一个厘米内的设备,而不是几米。

“人们知道他们正在被在线跟踪,”软件制造商figleaf App Inc.的首席运营官潘卡杰·斯里瓦斯塔瓦(Pankaj Srivasava)说。该公司提供保护个人信息的工具。“人们没有意识到,在现实世界中,他们可以处于同样的境地。”

细线

不过,一些电信业专家警告称,激进的隐私保护可能会削弱5G技术承诺的经济效益。依靠相机和街道传感器等设备的大量数据来培训软件的科技公司经常攻击欧洲的“通用数据保护条例”(General Data Protection Regulations),这是一套严格的数字隐私规则,于2018年生效,因为它剥夺了它们要分析的原始数据,而原始数据是更先进的人工智能的基石。

“欧洲人用GDPR打了自己的脚,”丹麦电信顾问约翰·斯特兰德(John Strand)说。“从字面上看,它禁止人工智能和机器学习。”

同时,宽松的5G监管也可能威胁安全,弗吉尼亚理工大学教授大卫·辛普森(David Simpson)说,他曾担任联邦通信委员会(Federal Communications Commission)公共安全和国土安全部的负责人。

辛普森先生列举了两个影响公共安全的例子。一方面,便宜的智能传感器可以收集有关建筑物、道路和桥梁结构完整性的实时信息,为土木工程师提供数据以避免事故。如果被滥用,类似的传感器和摄像机也可以在未经行人同意的情况下,有意或无意地从路过该区域的行人那里收集位置数据。

辛普森先生说:“虽然我非常不希望起重机跌倒在我的头上,但我也不想让我的运动在一个被老大哥追踪的城市里进行。”“我们应该遵循一致的隐私规范。你不应该收集比你需要的更多的关于我的信息。”

菲茨杰拉德先生是华盛顿特区“华尔街日报”的记者,请给他发电子邮件:andrew.fitzgerald@wsj.com。



(完)道琼斯通讯社

2019年11月11日东部时间22:00(格林威治时间03:00)

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